CHRIS FIELD
POSTDOC, ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY
UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT

    CODE                    CV                    PROJECTS                    CONTACT

I received my PhD from UConn EEB in 2016. Before graduate school, I worked for several years as a conservation practitioner at a national non-profit. My experiences working on the front lines of conservation have steered my research interests toward addressing questions with immediate, practical relevance to ongoing conservation activities. My dissertation research is focused on coastal conservation in the face of climate change, with a particular focus on Long Island Sound.

Increasingly, I'm taking a multi-disciplinary approach to research in order to better address the complexity of doing conservation in the real world. I'm very interested in collaborations with scientists in fields such as social psychology, environmental economics, decision analysis, and policy.

In addition to conservation research, I've spent time studying bird song, the demographics of early-successional birds, and the transmission dynamics of zoonotic diseases. Uniting all of my past and present research projects is a general interest in better understanding and evaluating the quantitative methods by which we make inferences about ecological patterns and processes. I'm especially interested in Bayesian analyses in BUGS/JAGS and R; I'll be posting the code from some some of my projects on this page. If you have any questions, contact christopher.field@uconn.edu


BACK TO TOP



CODE
Reed et al. 2014. Application of the complete-data likelihood to estimate juvenile and adult survival for the endangered Hawaiian stilt.
Code for the posterior predictive checks in Figure 4b.

BACK TO TOP



PROJECTS
SHARP
I'm currently a postdoctoral researcher for the Saltmarsh Habitat and Avian Research Program, a collaboration of academic, governmental, and non-profit partners. The main goals of the project are to provide information that is needed for the long-term conservation of New England and mid-Atlantic tidal marsh birds and to provide a consistent platform the future monitoring of North American tidal marsh birds. More info can be found here: http://www.tidalmarshbirds.org. My main contribution to this collaboration is population viability analyses for Saltmash Sparrows, Nelson's Sparrows, and Seaside Sparrows.

Sentinels of climate change
We are measuring the effects of climate change on Long Island Sound's coastal habitats and setting up a baseline for future monitoring. The central focus of this project is quantifying the potential for tidal marshes to migrate into coastal areas to escape sea-level rise, especially whether the resistance of coastal forest to recent sea-level rise will limit this potential. Funding comes from the Long Island Sound Study through the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protetction. More information here.

The human dimensions of marsh transgression and conservation
I am working with Ashley Dayer to quantify the attitudes and behavioral intentions of coastal landwoners in Connecticut to better understand how their actions will limit or encourage marsh transgression. This information will be incorporated into ongoing conservation planning models for Long Island Sound and ultimately will be used to refine estimate of future marsh extent in the face of sea-level rise. Data collection for this project recently wrapped up and we will be posting a copy of our survey questionnaire soon. Funding for this projection comes from Connecticut SeaGrant, Switzer Foundation, and UConn's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

CTBirdTrends
Chris Elphick and I have created a website of visualizations of population trends for Connecticut's birds: www.ctbirdtrends.org. We'll be adding more species and graphs soon.

BACK TO TOP



CONTACT
Office: BioPharm 310
Phone: 860-486-3005
Mailing address: 75 N. Eagleville Road, Unit 3043, Storrs, CT 06269-3043
christopher.field(at)uconn.edu
@cfieldnotes

BACK TO TOP



CV
Click here to download my CV.

BACK TO TOP